The perfect gift

So how many of you woodworking fathers were gifted with woodworking-themed presents for Father’s Day?

Getting gifts is awesome; I love any excuse to get something nice from my loved ones. Fortunately, my loved ones love me enough not to get tacky perfect-for-your-woodworker gifts typically promoted around Father’s Day, Christmas or any other gift-giving occasion.

You’ve probably seen them all: The shop clock that is – surprise! – made from a saw blade. A necktie with teensy little tools all over it. Or any T-shirt with a clever woodworking reference on it, especially if one of the words is a picture of a heart where the word “love” is supposed to go, as in “I [heart] sawdust.”

Tools make great gifts, but it’s exceedingly difficult to get the right thing. I like to pick out my own, and I suspect most of you do as well. Besides, only you know the exact inventory of your tools, what you have and what you need. Of course, if your loved one takes you to the tool store and says your gift is inside, just go pick it out, I’m thinking that’d be acceptable.

But if someone just has to give you a physical woodworking gift, my advice is for them to take a quick (surreptitious) stroll around the shop and check your supplies – sandpaper, glue, fasteners, etc. – then write down the exact brand, size, grit, whatever, and get that. Supplies are always needed, and always appreciated.

Of course, the greatest gift of all may have nothing to do with woodworking. My daughter got me the best Father’s Day gift I could want: a professionally bound book compiling photos of my young grandson’s first year and a half. I love woodworking, but it’s not my whole life. My family is, however, which is why I’ll cherish that book every moment I’m not in the shop.

A.J.

COMMENTS

  1. jerry moors wrote:

    Another way to insure you get what you want is to fill out a wish list available from many of the online tool sellers. Then your family can go there and order just what you want.

  2. Gregory Pace wrote:

    Sock and Underwear, and the visit when bring them over are my favorite gifts. folks generally ask for details on a shop item if they want to buy me something for the shop. they want to know it’s useful to me and I appreciate that.

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